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END SARS:
What happened, what is possible, and what is next?

In Government by Ife Ajayi November 29, 2020

I don’t know how I got there—on the street, with the protesters, and their songs and chants of “ENDSARS!”—but I feel like I was exactly where I was meant to be. When we were younger, we were taught to sing: “we are the leaders of tomorrow.” But what happens when the leaders of tomorrow emerge, and the leaders of today …


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The Importance of The Golden Stool to the Ashanti People

In Government by Kwasi Adu Poku November 29, 2020

Last year, I visited my homeland, Ghana, for the first time in my life. I did not know how much I would need that trip, and how the lessons I learnt would free me from myself. Being born and raised in Canada, it’s very easy to feel detached. Yet when I had the opportunity to visit Ghana and learn about …


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Heart Attack

In Government by Shirley Sozinha November 29, 2020

Everything you plant in Kinshasa grows. A seed towers into a mountain, a molecule of salt into a diamond, a quarrel between brothers boils into civil war.  Maybe this is why Congo is the most resource-rich nation on earth. Maybe this is why the plunder still rages. The Beauty of the Congo is not just in its earth, but also …


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From a kingdom to a nation: A Shona awakening

In Government by Tine Ndhlovu November 29, 2020

Usually, when people ask me where I am from or what my background is  and I mention Zimbabwe, they pause for a bit and either ask “where is that?” or “you’re the first person I’ve met from Zimbabwe.” The continuous response that always strikes me the most, however, is “MUGABE? that’s the country with Robert Mugabe right?”  After years of …


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From Press Secretary to Poet

In Government by Rika Mpogazi November 29, 2020

Words are powerful instruments that some are expertly trained to play. In West Africa, the talent of wordplay belongs to the Griots. These prolific wordsmiths form a caste of skilled storytellers, but the tales they regale are not fictional, they are rich oral accounts of West African history and philosophical thought.  In Medieval Mali, Griots of the Malian Empire served …



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The Myth of the Founding Fathers

In Government by Nonye Ngwaba November 29, 2020

If there were founding fathers, then surely, there must have been founding mothers. The birth of a nation, I am certain, is not without the influence of those most vital to its continued lineage. Those who were critical in shaping the destiny of our nations, birthing constitutions, and willing governance to existence are, at worse, erased from its history and, …


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What Happens After a Revolution:
Stories From Egypt

In Government by Salma El-Zamel November 29, 2020

It was the summer of 2017 and I had just graduated from my MA in Globalization. It had been 6 years since the Arab Revolutions, and 7 years since my last visit to Egypt. By then I had developed a hobby out of documentary photography and was yearning for a good adventure. I was torn between capturing the aesthetics of …


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Traditional Authority: Its Limits and Powers

In Government by Tobi Solebo November 28, 2020

Winston Churchill is quoted as saying “Democracy is the worst form of government except for all those other forms that have been tried.” It’s hard to disagree. When I compare democracy to other forms of government that I understand, this sentiment rings true to me. Worldwide, non-democratic governments are revered as illegitimate and primordial, while Democratic pursuits are funded by …



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Stories of the Caribbean:
Must Read books by Caribbean writers.

In Discover list by Ola Idris November 21, 2020

The Caribbean is littered with rich experiences and adaptations of life on the islands. The stories and culture often transcend borders and are reflected in the experiences of Caribbean immigrants all over the globe. Dive in with us into these narratives as we explore 7 titles written by Caribbean writers.  ‘Til the Well Runs Dry – Lauren Francis-Sharma Francis-Sharma takes …


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Why We Create Myths

In Door of Return by Akilah Walcott November 8, 2020

The point of mythology or myth is to point to the horizon and to point to ourselves: this is who we are; this is where we came from; and this is where we’re going.


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Transporting Mythology

In Door of Return by Reina Cowan November 8, 2020

“Eh Kwik!” “Eh Kwak!”  In her book, “Tales From the Caribbean,” author Trish Cooke recounts the call and expected response that raconteurs would give in her parents’ native Dominica before launching into traditional folk stories. With roots in African tradition oral tradition, this type of storytelling has allowed the passage of monsters and mischief-making characters across the Atlantic. Cooke notes …


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Intro: Door of Return

In Door of Return by TRAD November 8, 2020

In Bridgetown, the world has changed in many ways; a tiny rat with goat horns, bat wings and an eye is breaking into people’s homes and feeding on their terror. A large bird is sighted in the sky, causing the authorities to shut down all travel, and a herd of albino cows flock to the ocean. The Caribbean Ocean rages, …


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Prologue: Bue

In Door of Return by Mirabelle Harris-Eze November 8, 2020

“Bue pono no.” Open the door. Sunset, and our Chief Priestess stands on a grassy mountaintop amid water yams thick with the thatch of an unharvested season and calls on Nyame. She is trying to cast out a wicked future and invoke one where invaders do not capture our Helpers. Weeks ago, in the nebulous confines of tomorrow, she saw …


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Chapter 1: Waiting

In Door of Return by Odogwu Ibezimako November 8, 2020

In my dreams, there is a little girl standing in front of a door. Waiting.  And I am waiting too. For her, or for this dream to be over, and to be free from these tremors that haunt me at night. Whichever one comes first. I try to see what is on the other side, of her face, of My …


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Chapter 2: How to Break Open a Coconut

In Door of Return by Chelsea Bodoe November 8, 2020

There was an odd wind that evening that blew across the field. Something about it that carried an air of intrigue as it rustled the tall grass. As the big top tent rose, curiosities were wheeled in one by one under the cover of the night. Some boxes were large, and others were small. The night protected those wandering eyes …


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Chapter 3: Douen

In Door of Return by Aseja Dava November 8, 2020

Whole bites are taken out of Uncle Lu’s tomatoes. Bites shaped by vaguely human teeth, as if someone had taken a single chomp and decided to walk away. The black earth in Uncle’s garden is uplifted like it’s been danced in.  A breath exhales right by my ear, and I flinch.  “Akeelah, I don’t suppose your uncle wants to use …


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Chapter 4: Scream

In Door of Return by Omobolanle Olarewaju November 8, 2020

Who is Akeelah?  The question annoyed me, even now, days after my professor had asked it. It was homework, an introductory essay for the Literature elective I had stupidly decided to take. I had no idea where to begin. I knew I was myself, everyone has a sense of just knowing without really understanding. I knew instinctively what kind of …


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Chapter 5: The Kishi

In Door of Return by Akilah Walcott November 8, 2020

I stepped into Brown Sugar at a quarter past twelve. Dry-ice smoke coiled around my feet. The lights were low and colours skated across the dance floor, hues of blue, red and gold. Ganga, fried fish, sizzling meat and scented sweat shot into my nose. Bodies swayed to the vibrations of Chronixx from the speakers. An ache swirled in my …


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Chapter 6: Rooted

In Door of Return by Deijanelle Chretien November 8, 2020

There are some things the body remembers. How to ride a bike,  the way home, and the feeling of shame.  The tricky thing about the body is; it may heal from the scar left by a rabid dog, but it may never heal from the terror of its bite. I still hear barking in my dreams. The snicker of the …


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Chapter 7: Why the spider spin’s its web

In Door of Return by Ewurama Brew November 8, 2020

All the curry from her fingers rush into my nose. She was the peppers under her skin, and light as basil. All of her flowed into me as my nose swallowed the scents from her scarf. Her voice summons me to the places in between what is true, and what is possible. The living room became an auditorium, an arena, …


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Chapter 8: Flight

In Door of Return by Aseja Dava November 8, 2020

On my flight back home,  I clutched silvery and blue feathers for my life, riding on the back of a bird the size of a moon. We soared through a current of storm clouds as the bird spoke anxiously over the sound of thunder.  “I’d like to express that I have several concerns,” said the bird.  “Uh-huh,” I muttered, more …


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Chapter 9: Egg

In Door of Return by Chelsea Bodoe November 8, 2020

Everyone had gathered at the table for lunch, we had even convinced Grandma to come sit, although she had been strangely reluctant, muttering on about something she was looking after.  Come to think of it, Grandma had been distracted at the market. Rather than looking at what we needed for stew, she haggard over to stalls that were selling herbs …



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Door of Return Soundtrack

In Door of Return Playlist by TRAD November 8, 2020

It was Akeelah’s destiny to open the door of return 1000 years after her Ashanti ancestors put the helpers inside. But she forgot. Now the helpers are free and are ravaging her dreams and Bridgetown. Akeelah must find a way to reconcile with her history, and unravel the web Anansi spins for the people. This is a soundtrack to this …


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Marriage, Love, Sex, Power:
10 Must-Read Black Novels and Short Stories

In Discover list by Mirabelle Harris-Eze October 29, 2020

All uncomplicated relationships are alike; every complicated relationship is complicated in its own way (Anna Karenina principle anyone?). From polygynous partnerships to unpaid bride price, the novels and short stories below delve into a variety of relationships. Some stories will leave you asking: What’s love got to do with it? Others answer: Everything.


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A Black person’s guide to saving the planet

In Discover list by Gabriela Roberts October 25, 2020

The earth is in shambles. But it’s not entirely OUR fault. Sure there are things we can work on together. Take time to nurture our soil a bit more. But we are reducing reusing and recycling. The margine container with leftovers, eco-friendly. Plastic bag drawer for all our plastic bag needs, eco-friendly. Kids being yelled out to turn off the …


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How Black twitter is quarantining

In Discover list by Gabriela Roberts October 25, 2020

Black people have this united talent of making the best out of any situation. COVID-19 and quarantine is no expectation. Calling out someone’s ashy elbows can no longer happen as easily as before, we can still manage to laugh at other things like taking Dr. Umar out of context and applying his invigorated speech to literally anything else.  We have …


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All the places we would rather be, and then some.

In Discover list by Gabriela Roberts October 25, 2020

We all had travel plans this year. To Africa, to Asia, to the fridge. As unfortunate as it is that we were put on house arrest without warning for the last 7 months, that does not mean our travel plans have been totally wiped from this year. Many are rediscovering their own backyards, their states, provinces, and countries. With a little creativity (or delusion) you too can travel and have the vacation experience.


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Discover African and Black students Associations

In Discover list by Ola Idris October 25, 2020

Obviously these are not the only clubs that exist in Ontario or even in North America and the west that act as representatives of our collective power. Let us know about your Black/African Association and your experiences. We are always looking to connect and grow the TRAD family. We are who we are because of the people that have built us up!


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Rest is for the Strong

In Discover list by Ola Idris October 25, 2020

If 2020 has taught me one thing, it’s the importance of cultivating and healing my mental health. In a world where we are continuously absorbing content that is littered with Black and African Death, In a world where we are obviously addicted to social media and its connectivity, we are bringing you some accounts to add to your instagram and make your feed a space of healing.



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You need to work on your French

In Language Uncategorized by Marquise Kamanke October 21, 2020

“Il faut travailler ton Francais”, I recall my mum saying. “You need to work on your French.”  It was a regular summer afternoon, and as regular summer afternoons went, I was working on exercises from the next year’s curriculum under my mum’s supervision. This was when I was still in primary school, say grade 3 or 4. The subject I …


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Miss Lou’s View ( Patwa):
Celebrating a Jamaican Oman

In Language by Angelo Grant October 10, 2020

Fram reggae tu dub poetry tu pride in a wi culcha, nationality, and dialek, whole eep a ting bout wi Jamaican culcha wi owe nuff respek to one oman. As a poet, comedian, folklorist, television and radio personality, singer and actor, di whole a Jamaica luv har like fambily and call har Miss Lou – not Louise Bennett-Coverley. Di way …



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Lessons from a Sénégalese Polygot

In Language by Abeera Shahid October 10, 2020

No matter where we come from, languages are the tools by which we gain access to communities. Omar shared with us how growing up in Sénégal naturally made him into a polyglot.



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#4 Language Playlist

In Playlist by Writers Room October 9, 2020

Its never enough to read about languages, its not even enough to hear them. You have to feel it. The languages of our people are vessels that carry centuries of memory. From Xhosa clicks that are strung into melodies by Makeba and Bongeziwe to the clash of Wolof used as a rallying cry by Youssou N’dour, our languages tell the …


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The most romantic language in the world

In Language by TRAD October 9, 2020

There are about 2000 languages spoken on the African continent. This does not even include its vast diaspora. Our languages, like our peoples, are deeply diverse. Our languages are ancient and modern. They are recited, signed, written, and sung. They are Creoles and pidgins; they are holy languages and love languages. May the best language win.


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Why Fante is the most romantic language in the world?

In Language by Amandzeba Nat Brew September 19, 2020

I am of the hope that, by the end of this exercise, you would appreciate a great deal, my presentation of the various perspectives relative to the subject matter, and in conclusion, rightly agree that indeed, Fante, is the most romantic Ghanaian language, therefore, the most romantic language in the world.


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Where does a lost language go ?

In Language by Rebecca Seward Langdon September 19, 2020

Language is the foundation of human identity. In all its forms—whether it’s written, spoken, drawn, or signed—it has given us access to learn about societies that date back centuries before our time. It is a way for people and societies to connect and interact.



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Sign Languages:
Non-Oral Languages of Africa

In Language by Koubra Haggar September 19, 2020

Many linguists describe communication in most African regions as being heavily oral. Historically, many stories have been passed down through word of mouth.  But what happens when you do not speak with words, or listen with your ears?  Different types of communication within African cultures are rarely discussed.  What is not widely known is that  African regions have a long …


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If you speak Arabic, you must be ___

In Language by Esra Bengizi September 19, 2020

For most of my life, I have straddled this reckless line of never being African enough and also never being Arab enough. As a Libyan, I have been told I break the mold of who should be an Arab and cannot be placed in one of the countries in the Levant, Machrek and Maghreb regions. The cultural rule of thumb is: if you speak Arabic and you don’t belong to one of those countries then you are not a “true” Arab speaker.


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How Wolof became the dominant language in Sénégal.

In Language by Abeera Shahid September 19, 2020

As I walked through the streets of Dakar in Sénégal, I heard the whispers of Wolof all around me: Na nga def, mangi fi rekk, toubab. The words all blended together to my untrained ears. As a foreigner, I’d wrongfully expected to hear French, since Sénégal is a former colony of France. I later appreciated that the local language of the Wolof people was thriving here, unerased by the forces of colonization.


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Creoles: The Soulful Language of Black Folk

In Language by Aaron Parry September 19, 2020

Language is an integral element of our identities. It serves as an embodiment of our communities, our heritage, and oftentimes, our history. Our words can be used to express our deepest truths, but the dialect that we speak them in can reveal hidden stories that we may have been completely unaware of.


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Xhosa on the international stage

In Language by Tine Ndhlovu September 19, 2020

Behind every click, tonal pattern and phoneme, we hear a language so familiar to southern Africa and the continent. It is the language that was taken to the international stage, and amplified Makeba’s exoticness through her music, by having her sing her “click” songs—a diminutive term that white South Africans and Americans used to mimic the Xhosa language. A ‘click song’ to the colonial ear, ‘Qongqothwane’ to the Xhosa ear, but in its essence a song of good fortune.


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Difficult love and camaraderie:
Representing sapphic sexualities in African cultures

In Matrimony by Azza September 3, 2020

I’d often wonder if African peoples from before they were colonized had more comprehensive concepts of what constitutes a person, and how they understood romantic and sexual encounters between people. I wonder if by revisiting some of these concepts and reintroducing them, we can build a bridge to better care for, and respect queer Africans. Indegious african perspectives on sexuality are desirable, but not necessary to guarantee the dignity of members of our community.



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