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Reimagining Personhood

In Earth, Season 2 by Rhonda Nebiyou

Western jurisprudence conceives of individuals as atomistic actors that operate independently and are predominantly self-interested. In turn, a legal or juristic personality is understood as an entity other than a natural being that the law deems capable of upholding the rights, duties, and liabilities of a living person. This ideology, however, is problematic because it discounts the relationships that are …

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Land Stories: Letters I never sent

In Earth, Season 2 by Amanda Jeysing

As I write this my legs crossed on the chair   my fingers tap gently on a keyboard  my lips take alternative sips of orange juice and a berry smoothie  both reminding me that neither fruit was ripe or birthed from this soil I attempt to warm my hands in my partner’s comfy sweater it’s incredible how rubbing our hands together,  …

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Grey face studded by mineral – stoned, as her pockets bleed:
Cobalt Mining in D.R. Congo

In Earth, Season 2 by Yannick Mutombo

The freezing temperature of water is zero degrees Celsius. Mercury falls below this threshold; water molecules slow and coalesce into one solid structure. Ice will not form unless there is some sort of impurity in the water: specks of soil, bubbles of air. And so, in some cases water can remain in its liquid form at such low temperatures as …

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Why Black People Don’t Go Camping

In Earth, Season 2 by Brianna Fable

White child runs through scenic fields collecting wildflowers and stones. White child swims in the lake by her family’s cottage. She slathers sunscreen on her arms so that she doesn’t get burnt.  Black child runs through concrete playgrounds and grips metal monkey bars. Black child spins under the water of her family’s water hose. Black child inhales exhaust from streetcars …

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Amazi:
Reflections on Water

In Earth, Season 2 by Celine Isimbi

Amazi is Kinyrwandan for Water. Amanzi is IsiXhosa and IsiZulu for Water. Ama is Cherokee for Water. Madzi is Chichewa for Water. Omi is Yoruba for Water. Dlo is Haitian Creole for Water As I write this, I remember a question my professor posed to the class, “What is your gift to the Earth?”  This was after we discussed reciprocity …